Monday, August 19, 2013

Hail to the Queen


I just love Queen Anne's Lace...don't you?

I was looking on a few different websites and found out some facts that I didn't know...
... (duh...really?) ...about this frilly little flower.

Most people consider it a weed but if you know me, you know I never met a weed I didn't like :)

Did you know it is really a wild carrot? Here are some other things interesting things I found out:

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The American legend says that Anne of Denmark (1574-1619), queen consort of King James I, was an expert lace-maker. English legend tells us that Queen Anne challenged the ladies of the court to a contest to see who could produce a pattern of lace as lovely as the flower of this plant. The central flower of the carrot's umbel is reddish-purple. 

No one could rival the queen's handiwork. She however, pricked her finger with a needle and a single drop of blood fell into the lace, that is said to be the dark purple floret in the center of the flower. According to Webster's Ninth New Collegiate Dictionary the name Queen Anne's lace did not appear in print until 1895, two hundred seventy-six years after Anne's death.
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Queen Anne's Lace
    by Mary Leslie Newton    


Queen Anne, Queen Anne, has washed her lace
(She chose a summer's day)
And hung it in a grassy place
To whiten, if it may.

Queen Anne, Queen Anne, has left it there,
And slept the dewy night;
Then waked, to find the sunshine fair,
And all the meadows white.

Queen Anne, Queen Anne, is dead and gone
(She died a summer's day),
But left her lace to whiten in
Each weed-entangled way!


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I hope you have enjoyed this little tidbit of information as much as I have.

Have a fabulous week!

20 comments:

  1. Such a delicate flower. I like that you found one before it opened fully.

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  2. What a fun post - I especially enjoyed the poem!

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  3. You are a treasure....I always love your posts...:))))) Beautiful photos and I love the story!

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    1. Lisa...you're a sweetie...thank you!

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  4. How lovely! As always, I just love your photos - and it's a treat learning new things. I was most surprised to learn that Queen Anne's lace is really a wild carrot! Who knew???

    Isn't it just like God to make even His weeds beautiful?!

    GOD BLESS!

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    1. Aww...thank you, Sharon. I have to admit I was quite surprised to find out it was a wild carrot...and it's edible too! God is just so cool!

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  5. What a neat story and I love your pictures! Queen Anne's Lace has been blooming around here for a couple of weeks or more and I've enjoyed seeing them. I've never heard this story or the poem before! Thanks for sharing!

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    1. Thank you, Liz! It's amazing what we can find out by using Google these days, isn't it? I have always loved their lacy beauty and it was fun to find out about the legend behind it. Thank you for visiting my blog!

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  6. I love Queen Anne's Lace and used to pick many a bouquet of it for my mother when I was a young girl. This was a fun post to read since I did not know all of this background :)

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    1. Me too, Deb, and I always remember them being covered with bugs :) Thank you for visitng!

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  7. Pretty!!!

    Here's a weird thing: I was married to an English man, and lived in England for 6 years... My mother in law (also English), called Queen Anne's Lace COW PARSLEY. I always thought that was hilarious. I'm going to google that now! Julia

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    1. Julia...I think I do remember it being referred to as cow weed or something like that! It's interesting it is to learn some "inside" facts about common things we see everyday! Thank you for visiting my blog and taking time to comment!

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  8. Hi Debby! What interesting facts about such a pretty flower. I didn't know it was a carrot family flower? And the poem is so cute too.

    Thanks for the smile this morning!
    Ceil

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    1. I was surprised about the carrot thing too! The poem is very old...I think it originated in England :)

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  9. I love photographing Queen Anne's lace and have read about the information before, but I'm still fascinated every time to see it again!

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    1. I love it too...each one is so unique...no two the same! Thanks for stopping by!

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  10. I love it too. We called it Cow Parsley in England. I am not sure if its the same thing. The flowers are really beautiful and I would like some in my garden.
    Wonder if I could sneak a few from the roadsides
    Janice

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    1. Janice,
      Yes, I think I read something about it being called that also! It is really one of my favorite "weeds" :)

      Thanks for visiting and have a blessed week!

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Thank you for stopping by today! Your sweet comments are such an encouragement to me.

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